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Is your fuel ready for the Winter?

Mother nature is wrapping up 2016 with a frigid cold front across the Midwest, signaling a rough winter ahead of us to start the New Year.  Don’t begin 2017 with costly equipment repairs.

Avoid Fuel Gelling

Fuel additives are specifically formulated to keep heavy duty diesel engines performing at their peak.  Once winter approaches, fuel should be treated with an anti-gel additive package, designed to keep your equipment operating in cold temperatures.  If left untreated, fuel has a tendency to gel in winter weather causing unnecessary downtime and possible costly repairs.  Don’t neglect your equipment this winter–make certain your fuel is treated.

Diesel fuel gelling can be costly for both the vehicle and the company.
At 32 degrees, the wax in liquid form will crystallize and leave the fuel tank clouded.  At 10-15 degrees, it will finally start to gel and clog the tank and fuel filters. If you plan now, it will save you later.
Give us a call now.

Keeping Cool When the Heat is On – Chevron Lube Matters

coolant-blog-final

With all the emphasis placed on protecting moving engine parts with lubrication, it might surprise you that a large number of engine failures are caused by problems with the cooling system. Often, those problems are caused by the coolant either becoming contaminated or breaking down.

That’s why it’s important to check your coolant regularly. And by “check your coolant,” we don’t mean just making sure you have enough in the tank. We’re talking about running regular tests twice a year for contamination, deterioration or indicators of other problems in the systems such as rust and corrosion.

Protecting your cooling system means ensuring that the corrosion inhibitor levels in your coolant are adequate. The use of extended life coolants with Organic Additive Technology (OAT), can provide this protection for up to 8 years because of the longevity of the corrosion inhibitor additives. This, in turn, helps prevent corrosion particulates from flowing through the system’s pumps and hoses, which are vulnerable to wear and abrasion.

Twice a year you should test for coolant concentration to be sure you have the right balance between the water, base fluid and corrosion inhibitors. Often you can tell right away if there are problems by the color or clarity. If the coolant sample has turned or is turning brown, it’s a sign of possible rust, corrosion or coolant breakdown. The coolant should be flushed out and replaced. If there is no obvious difference in color, using a refractometer to measure ethylene glycol concentration will yield the most accurate indication of freeze protection.

At these same intervals, you can test for carboxylates (OAT’s), the organic inhibitors that protect metal surfaces from corrosion. You should also test for pH levels or acidity. High acidity is a sign that the coolant is degrading, which increases the risk of corrosive damage.

Although the trend in on-highway vehicles is toward nitrite-free coolants, off-road equipment may still require a coolant with nitrites for added cylinder liner cavitation protection. If you use one of these coolants, you’ll want to check to make sure you have the right concentration of nitrites at the same time you are performing these other tests.

As part of a coolant maintenance program, make sure the tank is always full and not allowing any air into the system, which can cause overheating. And finally, check that the radiator cap is in good condition and able to maintain adequate pressure. If the radiator seal is old or compromised in any way, it can allow evaporation of water, leaving an imbalanced level of water to ethylene glycol in the system. Maintaining the proper cooling system pressure will raise the boiling point of the coolant so it can continue to perform as the engine reaches higher temperatures.

Testing is fairly quick and easy – a small amount of prevention to help avert big problems down the road. The main point with cooling systems is to avoid the all-too-common tendency to “fill it and forget it.” Proper coolant system function is critical to the life of the engine, and it starts with a clean and stable coolant.

– See more at: http://www.chevronlubematters.com/2016/11/14/keeping-cool-when-the-heat-is-on-reduce-the-risk-of-cooling-system-failure/#sthash.EimacdqF.dpuf

Contact Us to request a coolant maintenance kit today!

Next Generation of Oil: PC-11

On December 1, 2016, two new categories of heavy-duty engine oil standards will be licensed: API CK-4 and FA-4. These new categories are part of Proposed Category 11 or PC-11.  PC-11 is broken down into two subcategories: PC-11A and PC-11B

PC-11A will consist of the viscosity grades we have today. CJ-4 to CK-4 backward compatible.

PC-11B engine oils that are lighter viscosity grades provide better fuel economy FA-4 oils will be of a lighter viscosity, they may not be backward compatible depending on OEMs.

Both engine oils will deliver superior performance over current oils. The CK-4 will protect new and older engine models. And, the FA-4 was designed to provide optimized fuel economy for 2017+ engines.

What does this mean for the off-road industry?

  • New diesel engine oil technology will provide opportunities for extended oil drain performance for off-road vehicles versus API CJ-4 Oils
  • Improved oil oxidation performance can help reduce piston deposit formation and increase engine rebuild life due to lower wear.
  • Potential selection of PC-11A SAE 10W-30 can provide improved start-up performance and better wear protection while maintaining hardware protection
  • Wide range of products will allow for improved product selection for both new and older equipment used by off-road equipment companies.

 

For more information please contact Gary Puckett at gary.puckett@jos.us.com or (317)432-3984.

 

Spring Clean

While spring is here and summer right around the corner now would be a good time to make sure that your fuel tanks are clean and ready to go for the construction Fuel Bacteria and Water Graphicseason. Water and bacteria can find their way into your tanks during this time and could cause you problems down the road.

Think of a fuel tank like your lawn in the spring or fall.  If you walk out to get the paper in the morning or mail in the evening take a look at your shoes when you get inside.  That same moisture on your bottle condensationshoes could be in your tanks.  Or think of a hot humid day with a cold drink in your hand.  Now pretend that the drink is your tank.  Where did all that moisture/ water go?  Remember this is happening everyday!  With newer equipment and their higher fuel standards, making sure your tanks are clean would help your company reduce downtime and make more money.  For more information on Jackson Oil’s Fuel Polishing services, visit: http://jacksonoilsolvents.com/services/fuel-filtering/

 

Please feel free to call or email JB Ban at 317-691-9534 or jb.ban@jos.us.com for more information.

2015 Year in Review

2015 goes down in the record books as our best yet in terms of each of our company segments performing at a high level. Crude prices fell to their lowest levels since the financial crisis which produced lower prices for our customers and lowered delivery expenses for our company. A tragic event reminded us that maintaining a safe work environment requires continuous focus and effort. Here are some of the positive changes that occurred throughout the year.

 

  • New transportation professionals were hired to expand our reach and capabilities.
  • Remodeling and repairs were performed on our “flagship” building.
  • Wayne saw the addition of new entrance gates and a card system for after-hour entry and additional repairs were made to the stair well and roof.
  • Jackson grew the DEF business by an additional 25% and maintained the number one slot as Brenntag’s largest DEF (diesel exhaust fluid) distributor in North America for much of 2015.
  • The best single month performance ever.
  • The Joe’s Junction location at Kentucky & Raymond opened and expanded their inside and outside offerings.
  • Jackson Oil & Solvents surpassed its’ largest year of grease sales.
  • Jackson Oil set a new record for equipment & services including our biggest installation ever at Celadon Trucking.
  • Jackson Oil & Solvents was able to reward our employees for jobs well done.

 

Whether you’re looking for increased equipment life through filtered fuel and lubricants, outstanding premium lubrication and antifreeze products (Chevron), the Cummins Endorsed Valvoline Premium Blue for your heavy-duty engine (Valvoline), the Titanium advantage of Kendall & Guardol (ConocoPhillips), or a trusted name in premium additized fuel (Howes), we hope you’ll choose Jackson Oil.

 

From our family to yours, we hope you had a Merry Christmas and have a Happy New Year. We are looking forward to providing you with great value and service in 2016.

 

Avoid Fuel Gelling Issues

Howes Winter Tow Guarantee

Avoid Costly Fuel Gelling Issues

Winter Treat Plus contains a concentrated cold flow improver designed to reduce the size and alter the shape of the wax crystals as they precipitate from the diesel fuel in low temperatures. This reduces vehicle failure during cold weather.

The best cold weather protection available.

  • Lowers the Cold Filter Plugging Point by up to 20 degrees or more.
  • Increases fuel economy – reduces the requirement for blended fuel, which has lower BTU content.
  • Prolongs fuel filter life. Reduces Contaminants and safely controls water.
  • Non-Alcohol formula is safe to use in all weather conditions.
  • Flows at -20º allowing you to store additive outside.Howes Diesel Treat Anti Gel


Why Howes?

Jackson Oil & Solvents, Inc. has been partnered with Howes because it is the most recognizable name in the fuel additive business. “Howes Diesel Treat Anti-Gel and Howes Meaner Power Kleaner are the #1 selling diesel additives in truck stops and travel plazas throughout North America”*.

 

*Howes Website 10/28/2015


 

Howes Winter Treat Plus

 

 

 

 

Howes Winter Treat Plus is available for purchase from Jackson Oil & Solvents, Inc. It can be included in pre-additized bulk fuel.

 

Howes Meaner Power Cleaner

 

 

 

Howes Diesel Treat with Anti-Gel is available from Jackson Oil in packaged sizes while Meaner Power Kleaner is available in packaged sizes as well as pre-additized bulk fuel.

 


 

To learn more about the “Winter Tow Guarantee”, see the below website for details when purchasing packaged goods. Speak with your sales consultant regarding the details for bulk fuel with the Howes Winter Treat Plus additive.
Winter Tow Guarantee

3 Easy Methods to Test DEF

This short film will take you through the proper ways to test the quality of your Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) Supply. As a customer, you have 3 easy methods to test your DEF: a visual test, a handheld test, and an in-house lab or certified DEF testing lab.

View the video to learn more:

Diesel Fuel and Cold Weather

Background

What is the lowest temperature at which a vehicle will start and run? This temperature is often referred to as the cold weather operability limit. The cold weather operability limit of a particular vehicle varies and is dependent upon the properties of the fuel and the design of the vehicle fuel system.

 

Fuel Properties

Diesel Fuel is a complex mixture of a wide variety of hydrocarbons. Depending on how the fuel is blended at the refinery, diesel fuel can contain up to 20% paraffin molecules, also known as “wax”. These wax molecules tend to stick together (agglomerate) as the temperature drops. The colder the fuel, the more the agglomerate until they form a crystal. These “crystals” can become so large that they will separate out of the fuel as a solid. At this point they are too large to pass through the fuel filter, so they stick to the surface of the filter. If the fuel temperature continues to fall, eventually enough wax crystals will form to completely block the filter surface, resulting in lack of fuel flow thereby stalling the engine.

 

Fuel Operability Predictors

There are three primary methods, which as currently used to predict the operability temperatures of fuel. Each method has its limitations in predicting cold weather operability, and no test currently can accurately predict operability for all vehicles.

 

The three predictor methods are:

  • Cloud Point
  • Pour Point
  • CFPP (Cold Filter Plug Point)

 

    • CLOUD POINT
      The Cloud Point of a fuel is usually 5 to 15° Fahrenheit above the operability temperature of the fuel, making Cloud Point a conservative measure of vehicle operability. Cloud Point is an important winter fuel property because it is a commonly measured specification. Knowing the fuel’s Cloud Point, combined with previous experience can be a very good place to start. Blending #1 diesel fuel will generally lower the Cloud Point by about 3°F for every 10% of #1 blended. Cloud Point is generally unaffected by common additives.Cloud Point is the temperature at which a wax crystal grows large enough to become visible. Cloud Point is measured using ASTM D-2500 test method. Generally, each diesel fuel supplier sets his or her own cloud point maximums, which may vary seasonally. For No. 1 diesel fuel, the winter Cloud Point will typically be -30°F or lower. For No. 2 diesel fuel, the winter Cloud Point will typically be +15°F or lower.

 

    • POUR POINT
      Pour Point is the temperature at which diesel fuel becomes so thick that it will no longer pour from a container. At this temperature the fuel is essentially unpumpable.Typical winter Pour Points for No. 1 diesel fuel are -30°F or lower. Typical winter Pour Points for No. 2 diesel fuel are 0°F of lower.

      Pour Point is typically well below the temperature at which the fuel will plug a fuel filter. Therefore Pour Point is a useful measure for fuel handling properties but not a good indicator of vehicle operability.

 

    • CFPP
      CFPP (Cold Filter Plug Point) is the temperature at which a fuel will plug a 45-micron screen under prescribed test conditions. CFPP is measured using European Test Method IP 309, and is currently the most commonly used cold weather operability indicator.Although widely used, CFPP has its limitations. While most vehicles will operate at outdoor temperatures down to the CFPP of the fuel, some will not. This is primarily due to verifying designs in the fuel systems.

 

NON-FUEL RELATED FACTORS FOR WINTER OPERABILITY

 

Fuel temperatures are generally higher than air temperature. Thus, the temperature at which a filter plugs generally does not occur until the outdoor air temperature drops below the critical fuel temperature. Fuel temperatures are affected by many factors including fuel storage conditions, engine types, fuel system designs, fuel heaters, and operating conditions.

    • FUEL STORAGE
      During the winter, fuel stored underground will tend to stay warmer than fuel stored above ground. In addition, the temperature of delivered fuel will have an impact on operability. As an example, fuel delivered at 50°F to a 125 gallon truck fuel tank in typical 8-mph wind conditions, at 0°F temperature will take about 12 hours to drop down to 10°F. However, fuel delivered at 30°F in similar conditions will take only 8 hours to get to the same point.

 

    • HARDWARE EFFECTS
      Although virtually all diesel engines recirculate fuel through the fuel injection system back to the fuel tank, the location of the vehicle’s fuel filter can impact cold weather operability. Some fuel systems place the fuel filter closer to the warm engine or shield the filter from the wind, while others are located on frame rails for ease of changing and draining. Locations close to the engine or shielded from the wind will tend to warm the fuel more than filters exposed to the wind and elements.Additionally, the high wind speeds will also increase the heat loss from equipment fuel tanks and lines. Windshields and insulation will help reduce heat loss. Many of the newer trucks have aerodynamic covers over the fuel tanks. These not only lower the power equipment of the vehicle, but also affect the convective heat loss from the tanks.

      Various types of heaters may be used to warm the diesel fuel and engines. Heaters can be places in a fuel tank, along fuel lines, at the fuel filters, and on the engine block to name a few locations. All of these devices tend to create a larger difference between actual fuel temperature and outdoor air temperature.

 

    • OPERATING CONDITIONS
      How a vehicle is operated also contributes to differences in fuel temperature. A vehicle operated 24 hours a day will have warmer fuel than an identical vehicle that s shut down for several hours each day. Additionally, differences in vehicle parking location can influence fuel tank temperatures. As noted earlier, a tank fueled with 50°F fuel and subject to 8-mph winds takes about 12 hours to get its fuel temperature down to 10°F. A truck that is parked in an area that is shielded from the wind will require almost 17 hours for its fuel temperature to reach 10°F

 

    • Near empty fuel tanks will cool off much more quickly than full tanks. Therefore, refueling prior to parking a vehicle will help slow fuel cooling.

 

IMPROVING WINTER FUEL PERFORMACE

There are many methods which help decrease fuel filter plugging. The most common are:

      • Blending #1 diesel fuel with #2 diesel fuel
      • Blending additives into the diesel fuel
      • Keeping the fuel warm
      • Keeping the fuel dry
      • Using a combination of the above methods

 

BLENDING #1 DIESEL FUEL

#1 diesel fuel contains a smaller concentration of paraffin molecules than #2. Reducing the percentage of paraffin molecules available for crystallization will lower the cold weather operability predictors for the fuel. For every 10% of #1 blended into #2 fuelse, the cold weather operability predictors (Cloud Point, Pour Point, and CFPP) will be reduced 3 to 4°F. However, #1 has lower BTU content than #2, thus decreasing energy available.

 

WAX MODIFYING ADDITIVES

Wax modifying additives (also referred to as flow improver additives) were developed to give fuels better low temperature filterability. When fuel cools, paraffin molecules tend to stick together to form wax crystals. Wax modifying additives are very long polymers, which tend to adsorb to the surface of paraffin molecules, hindering the growth of the wax crystals, resulting in smaller, more compact wax crystals. These smaller crystals do not separate out of the fuel and do not block fuel filters as easily.

While each method listed above will contribute to lowering fuel filtering plugging, no method will work in all circumstances.

Cold Weather Operation Tips

It’s that time of year again! The cold weather is here to stay for the next several months.
Is your fleet ready?

The following tips will prepare your vehicles for winter and help prevent cold temperature operability problems.

  • Pump water bottoms from storage tanks.
  • Kill microbial growth with Dual Phase Biocide
  • Keep tanks as dry as possible to reduce condensation. Fill vehicle fuel tanks before shutdown overnight. Keep your storage tanks filled as much as possible to reduce the amount of moisture buildup. Change or drain your fuel pump regularly.
  • Refueling prior to parking a vehicle will help slow fuel cooling. Near empty fuel tanks will cool off much more quickly than full tanks and condensation will form inside the tank.
  • Before winter, replace fuel filters, both primary and secondary, as a part of a good preventive maintenance program. Dirt and sludge build-up reduces the fuel flow to the injectors.
  • Drain the fuel/water separators and fuel filters with drains DAILY. This is an important key as water collected at the bottom will freeze and plug your fuel system. Fuel/water separators that are equipped with electric elements should be cleaned before winter.
  • Larger mesh filters should be considered in very cold climates.
  • It is highly recommended that in severe weather, the fuel/water separators be replaced with spin on fuel filters that will allow the additive to mix with the water and burn with the fuel. Water separators will collect the water at the bottom of the filter, which typically freezes and plugs the fuel system.
  • Drain water separators often.

 

For questions about how to maintain your fleet during the winter for optimal performance, contact us! Our 40+ years of experience is here to help.