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Next Generation of Oil: PC-11

On December 1, 2016, two new categories of heavy-duty engine oil standards will be licensed: API CK-4 and FA-4. These new categories are part of Proposed Category 11 or PC-11.  PC-11 is broken down into two subcategories: PC-11A and PC-11B

PC-11A will consist of the viscosity grades we have today. CJ-4 to CK-4 backward compatible.

PC-11B engine oils that are lighter viscosity grades provide better fuel economy FA-4 oils will be of a lighter viscosity, they may not be backward compatible depending on OEMs.

Both engine oils will deliver superior performance over current oils. The CK-4 will protect new and older engine models. And, the FA-4 was designed to provide optimized fuel economy for 2017+ engines.

What does this mean for the off-road industry?

  • New diesel engine oil technology will provide opportunities for extended oil drain performance for off-road vehicles versus API CJ-4 Oils
  • Improved oil oxidation performance can help reduce piston deposit formation and increase engine rebuild life due to lower wear.
  • Potential selection of PC-11A SAE 10W-30 can provide improved start-up performance and better wear protection while maintaining hardware protection
  • Wide range of products will allow for improved product selection for both new and older equipment used by off-road equipment companies.

 

For more information please contact Gary Puckett at gary.puckett@jos.us.com or (317)432-3984.

 

Is Your Equipment Operating at its Peak Performance – Chevron Lube Matters

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When it comes to protecting the hydraulic systems used in a wide range of operations, from waste hauling to construction to manufacturing plants, all hydraulic fluids are not formulated the same. Only premium hydraulic lubricants are formulated to effectively protect against wear, ensure productive and safe performance and maximize useful equipment life.

 

What are Premium Hydraulic Lubricants?

Premium hydraulic oils have several characteristics that make them well worth the investment. One of those is a high viscosity index that promotes energy efficiency. When hydraulic fluids flow through equipment, as much as 20% in operating efficiency is lost due to friction and internal leakage. Properly formulated premium hydraulic lubricants, with the right base oil, additive system, and high viscosity index, offset those losses with a lower coefficient of friction that helps them perform more effectively in a wider operating range, and maintain viscosity at high temperatures to minimize internal leakage.

– See more at: http://www.chevronlubematters.com/2016/06/02/is-your-equipment-operating-at-its-peak-performance/#sthash.MHPmFUS7.dpuf

Understanding ISO Cleanliness Codes – Lube Matters

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Think about this: what’s the most critical part of the building you’re standing in? Quite simply, there is no building without a foundation. You may not see it or think about it, but it’s there, below the surface – that solid base that sets the stage for the structure and everything it holds.

The oils, lubricants and hydraulic fluids you use in your equipment play the same role. A clean lubricant is the foundation for maximizing component life. When contaminants you can’t even see reside in lubricants, they threaten equipment reliability. And that can disrupt your business operations and drive up maintenance and equipment costs.

– See more at: http://www.chevronlubematters.com/2016/03/30/know-your-numbers-understanding-iso-cleanliness-codes/#sthash.5GGUOqkJ.dpuf

 

 

Extended-Life Coolant (ELC)

Delo ELC AFC 5050 Silver Red Cap What is Extended-Life Coolant (ELC)?

Extended-life coolants are coolants that use advanced organic acid technology (OAT). These additives deplete at a much slower rate than traditional coolant additives. This slow rate of depletion allows the coolant to protect the engine in a much more efficient manner and provide longer protection compared to conventional coolants. This eliminates the need to add Supplemental Coolant Additives (SCAs), extending coolant service intervals and providing superior heat transfer, cavitation protection, and corrosion protection.

Extended-life coolants should only be used on approved engines, as the organic acids can be incompatible with certain metallic and nonmetallic materials. Some brass compounds and some silicone-based seal materials can be adversely affected by prolonged exposure to extended life coolant, particularly in areas where the material is “scrubbed” by the coolant moving at high speeds inside the engine. So, be sure to check the owner’s manual for compatibility.

What are the benefits of Extended-Life Coolants?

Because the organic acid technology in extended life coolant protects the engine system without use of conventional abrasive corrosion inhibitors such as silicate and phosphate, truck and bus owners will benefit by:

– Avoiding silicate dropout (sometimes called “green goo”), which clogs coolant passageways.

– Reducing water pump seal failures.

– Improving hard water compatibility, reducing hard scale that can deposit.

– Improving maintenance costs. Due to the longer service intervals, fewer labor hours are required and fewer materials need to be purchased.

– Reduce engine operating temperature increasing component life.

– Extend the engine oil’s life by reducing the oxidation rate caused by higher temperatures, This will help increase drain intervals also decreasing maintenance and labor costs for oil changes.

What is the expected life of Extended-Life Coolants?Delo ELC AFC Conc Blue Red Cap

Commercial pre-diluted mixes, such as Chevron DELO Extended Life Coolant, will provide engine protection for up to 750,000 miles in on-road applications, and 15,000 hours, or 8 years in off-road and non-highway use depending on the severity of truck, bus, or equipment usage. You can also increase the benefits of the extended-life coolant further by adding a coolant extender to the cooling system. Doing so will provide an additional 250,000 miles in on-road use and 5,000 hours protection in off-road and non-highway applications. After 1,000,000 miles, 20,000 hours, or eight years, the coolant should be drained, flushed, and refilled.

Are Extended-Life Coolants Compatible with Conventional Coolants?

Although extended-life coolant is compatible with conventional coolant, mixing extended-life coolant with conventional coolant to top off leaks will reduce the benefits of the extended-life coolant. If mixture with conventional coolant exceeds 10%, the coolant must be maintained as a conventional system using SCAs, or should be drained and flushed, then refilled with new extended-life coolant.

 

 

– James Blankenbeckler, Commercial Sales & Service Division

 

 

3 Easy Methods to Test DEF

This short film will take you through the proper ways to test the quality of your Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) Supply. As a customer, you have 3 easy methods to test your DEF: a visual test, a handheld test, and an in-house lab or certified DEF testing lab.

View the video to learn more:

Diesel Fuel and Cold Weather

Background

What is the lowest temperature at which a vehicle will start and run? This temperature is often referred to as the cold weather operability limit. The cold weather operability limit of a particular vehicle varies and is dependent upon the properties of the fuel and the design of the vehicle fuel system.

 

Fuel Properties

Diesel Fuel is a complex mixture of a wide variety of hydrocarbons. Depending on how the fuel is blended at the refinery, diesel fuel can contain up to 20% paraffin molecules, also known as “wax”. These wax molecules tend to stick together (agglomerate) as the temperature drops. The colder the fuel, the more the agglomerate until they form a crystal. These “crystals” can become so large that they will separate out of the fuel as a solid. At this point they are too large to pass through the fuel filter, so they stick to the surface of the filter. If the fuel temperature continues to fall, eventually enough wax crystals will form to completely block the filter surface, resulting in lack of fuel flow thereby stalling the engine.

 

Fuel Operability Predictors

There are three primary methods, which as currently used to predict the operability temperatures of fuel. Each method has its limitations in predicting cold weather operability, and no test currently can accurately predict operability for all vehicles.

 

The three predictor methods are:

  • Cloud Point
  • Pour Point
  • CFPP (Cold Filter Plug Point)

 

    • CLOUD POINT
      The Cloud Point of a fuel is usually 5 to 15° Fahrenheit above the operability temperature of the fuel, making Cloud Point a conservative measure of vehicle operability. Cloud Point is an important winter fuel property because it is a commonly measured specification. Knowing the fuel’s Cloud Point, combined with previous experience can be a very good place to start. Blending #1 diesel fuel will generally lower the Cloud Point by about 3°F for every 10% of #1 blended. Cloud Point is generally unaffected by common additives.Cloud Point is the temperature at which a wax crystal grows large enough to become visible. Cloud Point is measured using ASTM D-2500 test method. Generally, each diesel fuel supplier sets his or her own cloud point maximums, which may vary seasonally. For No. 1 diesel fuel, the winter Cloud Point will typically be -30°F or lower. For No. 2 diesel fuel, the winter Cloud Point will typically be +15°F or lower.

 

    • POUR POINT
      Pour Point is the temperature at which diesel fuel becomes so thick that it will no longer pour from a container. At this temperature the fuel is essentially unpumpable.Typical winter Pour Points for No. 1 diesel fuel are -30°F or lower. Typical winter Pour Points for No. 2 diesel fuel are 0°F of lower.

      Pour Point is typically well below the temperature at which the fuel will plug a fuel filter. Therefore Pour Point is a useful measure for fuel handling properties but not a good indicator of vehicle operability.

 

    • CFPP
      CFPP (Cold Filter Plug Point) is the temperature at which a fuel will plug a 45-micron screen under prescribed test conditions. CFPP is measured using European Test Method IP 309, and is currently the most commonly used cold weather operability indicator.Although widely used, CFPP has its limitations. While most vehicles will operate at outdoor temperatures down to the CFPP of the fuel, some will not. This is primarily due to verifying designs in the fuel systems.

 

NON-FUEL RELATED FACTORS FOR WINTER OPERABILITY

 

Fuel temperatures are generally higher than air temperature. Thus, the temperature at which a filter plugs generally does not occur until the outdoor air temperature drops below the critical fuel temperature. Fuel temperatures are affected by many factors including fuel storage conditions, engine types, fuel system designs, fuel heaters, and operating conditions.

    • FUEL STORAGE
      During the winter, fuel stored underground will tend to stay warmer than fuel stored above ground. In addition, the temperature of delivered fuel will have an impact on operability. As an example, fuel delivered at 50°F to a 125 gallon truck fuel tank in typical 8-mph wind conditions, at 0°F temperature will take about 12 hours to drop down to 10°F. However, fuel delivered at 30°F in similar conditions will take only 8 hours to get to the same point.

 

    • HARDWARE EFFECTS
      Although virtually all diesel engines recirculate fuel through the fuel injection system back to the fuel tank, the location of the vehicle’s fuel filter can impact cold weather operability. Some fuel systems place the fuel filter closer to the warm engine or shield the filter from the wind, while others are located on frame rails for ease of changing and draining. Locations close to the engine or shielded from the wind will tend to warm the fuel more than filters exposed to the wind and elements.Additionally, the high wind speeds will also increase the heat loss from equipment fuel tanks and lines. Windshields and insulation will help reduce heat loss. Many of the newer trucks have aerodynamic covers over the fuel tanks. These not only lower the power equipment of the vehicle, but also affect the convective heat loss from the tanks.

      Various types of heaters may be used to warm the diesel fuel and engines. Heaters can be places in a fuel tank, along fuel lines, at the fuel filters, and on the engine block to name a few locations. All of these devices tend to create a larger difference between actual fuel temperature and outdoor air temperature.

 

    • OPERATING CONDITIONS
      How a vehicle is operated also contributes to differences in fuel temperature. A vehicle operated 24 hours a day will have warmer fuel than an identical vehicle that s shut down for several hours each day. Additionally, differences in vehicle parking location can influence fuel tank temperatures. As noted earlier, a tank fueled with 50°F fuel and subject to 8-mph winds takes about 12 hours to get its fuel temperature down to 10°F. A truck that is parked in an area that is shielded from the wind will require almost 17 hours for its fuel temperature to reach 10°F

 

    • Near empty fuel tanks will cool off much more quickly than full tanks. Therefore, refueling prior to parking a vehicle will help slow fuel cooling.

 

IMPROVING WINTER FUEL PERFORMACE

There are many methods which help decrease fuel filter plugging. The most common are:

      • Blending #1 diesel fuel with #2 diesel fuel
      • Blending additives into the diesel fuel
      • Keeping the fuel warm
      • Keeping the fuel dry
      • Using a combination of the above methods

 

BLENDING #1 DIESEL FUEL

#1 diesel fuel contains a smaller concentration of paraffin molecules than #2. Reducing the percentage of paraffin molecules available for crystallization will lower the cold weather operability predictors for the fuel. For every 10% of #1 blended into #2 fuelse, the cold weather operability predictors (Cloud Point, Pour Point, and CFPP) will be reduced 3 to 4°F. However, #1 has lower BTU content than #2, thus decreasing energy available.

 

WAX MODIFYING ADDITIVES

Wax modifying additives (also referred to as flow improver additives) were developed to give fuels better low temperature filterability. When fuel cools, paraffin molecules tend to stick together to form wax crystals. Wax modifying additives are very long polymers, which tend to adsorb to the surface of paraffin molecules, hindering the growth of the wax crystals, resulting in smaller, more compact wax crystals. These smaller crystals do not separate out of the fuel and do not block fuel filters as easily.

While each method listed above will contribute to lowering fuel filtering plugging, no method will work in all circumstances.

Cold Weather Operation Tips

It’s that time of year again! The cold weather is here to stay for the next several months.
Is your fleet ready?

The following tips will prepare your vehicles for winter and help prevent cold temperature operability problems.

  • Pump water bottoms from storage tanks.
  • Kill microbial growth with Dual Phase Biocide
  • Keep tanks as dry as possible to reduce condensation. Fill vehicle fuel tanks before shutdown overnight. Keep your storage tanks filled as much as possible to reduce the amount of moisture buildup. Change or drain your fuel pump regularly.
  • Refueling prior to parking a vehicle will help slow fuel cooling. Near empty fuel tanks will cool off much more quickly than full tanks and condensation will form inside the tank.
  • Before winter, replace fuel filters, both primary and secondary, as a part of a good preventive maintenance program. Dirt and sludge build-up reduces the fuel flow to the injectors.
  • Drain the fuel/water separators and fuel filters with drains DAILY. This is an important key as water collected at the bottom will freeze and plug your fuel system. Fuel/water separators that are equipped with electric elements should be cleaned before winter.
  • Larger mesh filters should be considered in very cold climates.
  • It is highly recommended that in severe weather, the fuel/water separators be replaced with spin on fuel filters that will allow the additive to mix with the water and burn with the fuel. Water separators will collect the water at the bottom of the filter, which typically freezes and plugs the fuel system.
  • Drain water separators often.

 

For questions about how to maintain your fleet during the winter for optimal performance, contact us! Our 40+ years of experience is here to help.

Buzz About Natural Gas

What is CNG?

Rising diesel fuel costs and the shale-gas boom in the last couple of years has caused many fleet companies to begin looking at natural gas as an alternative to diesel fuel.   Large amounts of natural gas in shale rock formations has been unlocked by improved drilling techniques, making the fuel cheaper and more plentiful across the U.S.   However, the major concern for fleet owners is the cost of natural gas engines.  Vehicles equipped to run on natural gas typically cost quite a bit more than conventional diesel models, but because of the significant price gap between natural gas and diesel fuel many companies are beginning to justify the transition–breaking even in just a couple of years.   At the pump, a gallon of diesel often costs more than twice as much as natural gas, on a diesel-gallon-equivalent basis.

 

Another disadvantage of natural gas is that it isn’t as dense as diesel.  Compressed natural gas (CNG) is only 25% as dense and super-chilled or liquefied natural gas (LNG) is 60% as dense. That means vehicles need more tanks or bigger tanks to go as far, or they must refuel more often. Thus the shift has been mainly in local fleets such as trash trucks, city buses, or delivery trucks that go back to home base each night, where they can re-fuel.  Many long-haul truckers remain concerned about a lack of natural gas fueling stations across the U.S.  Other challenges include the bulky tanks for compressed gas and the hazards of handling liquefied gas.  In the past, the volatility of natural-gas prices also hampered wider use.

 

Besides the decreased cost of fuel, another benefit to natural gas engines is its environmental impact.  Tailpipe emissions would drop since natural gas burns cleaner than diesel fuel or gasoline.

 

We at Jackson Oil & Solvents, Inc. believe that this transition will continue, but it will be a slow process.  We are keeping our finger on the pulse of this transition and will be equipped to handle the needs of our clients as demand continues to increase.  Europe, Asia-Pacific, and Australia have transitioned to natural gas quicker than the U.S., but that is pretty typical.  Many fleet owners are trying to determine whether natural gas really has legs as a transportation fuel.   As natural gas becomes more readily available (increased infrastructure) and the cost of natural gas engines continues to decrease, we will see an increasing speed of transition.  Don’t worry, though, Jackson Oil & Solvents will be ready!

 

FAQ – Racing Gas

A tremendous addition to Jackson Oil & Solvents, Inc. was the creation of a 24hr Racing Gas Station. About 6 years ago, we noticed that the majority of our racing customers wanted to pick up fuel just before the race. This created some challenges as this could range from late at night to late into the weekend. Our solution – a 24hr Racing Gas Station.

The site is well lit and capable of accepting most major credit cards. 3 years ago, Jackson created an alliance with VP Racing and now customers can buy the finest racing products available in the market all at one location. (more…)

Fixed Price Contract

Hedging is a way of reducing some of the risk involved in holding an investment. There are many different risks against which one can hedge and many different methods of hedging. When someone mentions hedging, think of insurance. A hedge is just a way of insuring an investment against risk.

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5-minute-chart

Consider a simple (perhaps the simplest) case. Much of the risk in committing to a fixed price for anything over an extended period is market risk ; i.e. if the market rises sharply, chances are that all of your costs will too. So if you bid a price for haulig materials for the next six months, you may do well to hedge your fuel costs.

There are many ways of hedging against market risk. The simplest, but most expensive method, is to buy a call option for the fuel you expect to purchase. (It’s most expensive because you’re buying insurance not only against market risk but against the risk of the specific security as well.) You can hedge by buying financial futures (e.g. the S&P 500 futures). If fuel prices skyrocket, exercise the option and buy the fuel for the lower price.

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Propane FAQ

Many people call in and ask whether we exchange or fill propane tanks. At Jackson Oil, we can refill any propane tank large or small at our facility. We can fill different shapes and sizes as long as the tank is not expired.

Here are some Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) about Propane:

Q: Is refilling a propane tank cheaper than exchanging?
A: Yes! Refilling a propane tank is cheaper than exchanging. If you exchange your propane tank, you do not receive credit for anything you had left in the tank. Get your tank refilled by one of our professionals and pay for only what you need.

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FAQ about the Jackson Operation

Where does Jackson Oil & Solvents deliver to? (How far?)

One of our core tenents is delivery; so, Jackson will deliver anywhere that makes financial sense for us. For the customer, we can be most competitive when delivering large quanities short distances. More specifically, for transport loads, we can be more competitive when staying closer to the terminals that we pull fuel from. For products that require special handling and equipment for delivery, and where the product originates outside the state, our delivery area includes most of Indiana and parts of Ohio, Illinois, and Michigan.

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